Wednesday, January 04, 2006

oops

I must admit this is one of "ours," the cover of the prayer booklet for Covenant Week of Prayer (observed January 8-14). Maybe one of our first prayer requests should be for the gift of proofreading.
The folks at the office of Church Growth and Evangelism apparently caught it sometime after printing the booklets, but before running the companion poster (featuring the same artwork but a more conventional spelling).
Our youth pastor, Mark Swanson, observed that "Shepard" is not flagged by the Microsoft spellchecker, thanks to American astronaut Allan Shephard (thus the revision at right). What a wag! Too bad he went to North Park; we could have made a Theologiggler out of someone with his mutation.

4 comments:

Jana Riess said...

It is truly distrssing how few people take the time to proofread what they've written. And then I get even more distressed when I am the only one who seems to care. I loved Lynne Truss's book on grammar and punctuation and proudly label myself a "stickler" in her definition.

The worst story I've ever heard was told to me by a publicist friend of mine who has her own company. She once saw the suggested letterhead for a rival PR firm that had omitted the letter "l" from "public" relations. The implication seemed to be that this publicist was either sleeping with all her clients or was willing and eager to do so. Oops.

Jana

Jana Riess said...

How ironic that I misspelled "distressing" in a post about how important it is to proofread. Sigh. And of course, I can't figure out how to go back and edit it now. Technology.

Dawn B said...

Have you ever read the journals of Lewis & Clark--written before the days of standardized spelling? Our local paper ran a little excerpt each day from them in honor of the anniversary. It made me crazy to find a red pen at first. :-)

Ron Rienstra said...

Anytime people remark on unconventional spelling in ye olden dayze, she responds with a "yeah - welcome to my world." Not because of her students so much as her 16th and 17th century research.